Projects

Bridging Diabetes and TB Control in Moldova WDF14-934

WDF14-934
The project seeks to improve detection and treatment of people with diabetes and TB and strengthen collaboration in fighting the two diseases throughout Moldova.
Background
People with diabetes are around 2.5 times more likely to develop tuberculosis (TB) than those without diabetes. In the Republic of Moldova TB is a serious health with high prevalence and as prevalence of diabetes (DM) is also high the risk of comorbidity is a serious health issue. However, knowledge of the comorbidity, ways to screen, treat, record and report of the two diseases are not well known in health care settings or among the general population.
 
Objectives
The goal of the project is to establish mechanisms of collaboration between DM and TB activities among health care providers. It is also wanted to make awareness on DM, and its links with TB, among the general population.
 
Approach
The project consists of five steps to improve the collaboration and detection of the two diseases.
 
First step is to establish mechanisms of collaboration between DM and TB activities by assisting policy-makers, public health practitioners and clinicians in how to manage the joint burden of the two disease entities. The activity is to establish clear protocols of the collaborative activities for health care providers.
 
Second step is to intensify diagnosing and management of DM in patients with TB by screening TB patients with measurements of the 2 hour postprandial glucose (2hPG).
 
Third step is to intensify diagnosing and management of TB in patients with DM at DM facilities and family doctors by screening patients when they come to the clinics with relevant symptoms.
 
Fourth step is to undertake meetings for TB and DM care providers and family doctors. The purpose is to teach the health care providers about the linkage between the two diseases, referral mechanisms and how to treat the diseases.
Lastly awareness will be raised in the general population on DM, and it links with TB, by movie-clips, radio advertising, posters and leaflets and World Diabetes Day
 
Expected Results:
 
100 Tuberculosis specialists trained in  management of diabetes
60 diabetes care specialists trained in management of tuberculosis
480 family doctors trained in tuberculosis-diabetes management
3000 tuberculosis patients screened for diabetes
2000 diabetes patients screened for tuberculosis
Educational materials made available for diabetes and TB patients and family 
Awareness raised among at least 1000 people from risk group 
Improved public and key stakeholder awareness about diabetes-TB linkage
2 million people sensitised to the problem of diabetes and tuberculosis
 
Results at completion:
•    993 doctors, incl. TB specialists, endocrinologists and family doctors trained in management of diabetes and tuberculosis 
•    2730 tuberculosis patients screened for diabetes
•    Educational materials made available to diabetes and TB patients and family members
•    Awareness raised among 510 people from risk group
•    Public and key stakeholder awareness about diabetes and TB linkage improved through establishment of national coordination body
•    An estimated 500,000 people sensitised to the problem of diabetes and tuberculosis.
 

 

Project information

Project nr.: 
WDF14-934
Project Status: 
Completed
Interventions and focus areas: 
Primary focus area: 
Region: 
Europe
Country: 
Moldova
Partners: 
Association for Study of Chronic Diseases
Project responsible: 
Dr. Natalia Palarie
Project period: 
2015 to 2017
Project budget: 
EUR 460,170
WDF contribution: 
EUR 149,569
Results at completion:
•    993 doctors, incl. TB specialists, endocrinologists and family doctors trained 
•    2730 TB patients screened for diabetes
•    Educational materials made available to diabetes and TB patients and family
•    Awareness raised among 510 people from risk group
•    Public and key stakeholder awareness about diabetes and TB linkage improved 
•    An estimated 500,000 people sensitised to the problem of diabetes and TB