Projects

Indigenous women’s initiative for preventing diabetes & NCDs, WDF15-1212

WDF15-1212
Preventing diabetes and other non-communicable diseases and promoting healthy life-style among the poor indigenous people belonging to the Ao Naga tribe in Nagaland state, India.

Indigenous men, women and children of the Ao Naga tribe are living below the poverty line in the remote and inaccessible villages in Mokokchung district. They have very little knowledge about diabetes and other non-communicable diseases. The prevalence of diabetes is high: 24%, compared to the average of 8% in India, mainly due to lack of awareness of diabetes and a diet rich in carbohydrates, combined with very little physical activity.

Awareness of diabetes and how to manage it is very low in this group, but due to their changing life-style they are at high risk for developing the disease. In addition, they lack access to health care facilities where personnel are trained in the detection and management of diabetes.

 

Objectives

To create awareness about diabetes and other non-communicable diseases, to screen 14,000 high risk people for diabetes and to promote healthy life-style among the indigenous men, women and children of Nagaland, India.

 

Approach

Through events at market places, schools and community halls awareness about diabetes and other non-communicable diseases will be raised and healthy lifestyles promoted among indigenous peoples in the Mokokchung district. The events will focus on the causes and effects of diabetes, diabetes complications and management, and life-style modifications.

At-risk persons will be detected based on age, BMI, waist circumference and family history and screened for diabetes via fasting blood sugar tests. They will  subsequently be referred to the district hospital for care and treatment. Those diagnosed with diabetes will be offered follow-up by trained HCPs and local partner societies.

The project will also carry out capacity building of doctors and community health workers, including traditional healers, on diabetes prevention, care and management.

 

Expected results

  • 45,000 indigenous people educated about diabetes, other NCDs and life-style adjustment
  • 14,000 indigenous men, women and children at risk of diabetes screened
  • People detected with diabetes referred to the district hospital for care and treatment
  • 120 doctors, nurses, paramedical staff, traditional healers and grass-root health workers receive training on diabetes and its management
  • 300 diabetes awareness and screening camps organised over a period of two years.Indigenous people including men, women and children will start a health life-style
     

Project information

Project nr.: 
WDF15-1212
Project Status: 
Ongoing
Interventions and focus areas: 
Primary focus area: 
Region: 
South East Asia
Address of head office: 
India
Partners: 
Longjaknep Women Welfare Society
Project responsible: 
I. Amenla
Project start date: 
2015 to 2017
Project budget: 
USD 81,606
WDF contribution: 
USD 70,566

Expected results

  • 45,000 indigenous people educated about diabetes, other NCDs and life-style adjustment
  • 14,000 indigenous men, women and children at risk of diabetes will be screened
  • People detected with diabetes referred to the district hospital for care and treatment
  • 120 doctors, nurses, paramedical staff, traditional healers and grass-root health workers trained
  • 300 diabetes awareness and screening camps organised over a period of two years